Category: Veggies

Chimichurri and a Charred Broccoli Salad

This is unbelievably easy. I’ve always wanted to make chimichurri. I don’t eat it that often, but I love it every time I do, and I’ve heard it’s easy. It is easy. It is delicious. It’s hard not to always have some on hand.

Charred broccoli is ridiculously good too. I added more red pepper flakes to the dressing because you know that’s how I do, but you could back off. The original recipe had arugula, but I didn’t want to buy an entire container just for a cup of arugula. Bulk mixed greens were a fine substitute. For some reason, the vegetable peeler was making gigantic pieces of cheese. I think I’d shred it next time for better distribution. I’ll take cheese with every bite, thankyouverymuch.

The steak method is pretty much the go-to. It yields such a juicy steak. I live and die by my thermometer now. Consistent results every time. I ended up with a smaller steak just because a) New Seasons ran out and b) I really don’t need to eat more than a half pound of steak in a sitting, do I? If you put it in front of me, you know I’ll eat it. It meant that the meat to chimichurri recipe was a little off, but that’s ok. You’ll want to eat this stuff by the spoonful.

Inspiration: The Splendid Table

Ingredients

  • 1lb flank steak
  • 1lb broccoli florets, cut into even pieces
  • 1 cup mixed greens
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 3 teaspoons honey
  • 2 teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 1/4 cup of pecorino romano cheese, peeled with a vegetable peeler
  • 1 1/2 cups parsley
  • 3/4 cup cilantro
  • 1 shallot, sliced thin
  • 1 tablespoon sherry vinegar
  • 2 garlic cloves, sliced thin
  • 1/2 cup + 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • salt and pepper

Preparation

Season both sides of the steak with salt. Set aside until needed, allowing it to come up to room temperature.

Heat a 12″ skillet on high heat. Add the broccoli florets and cook them, stirring occasionally, until they start to char on all sides. This will take 8-10 minutes. Toss the broccoli in a large bowl with the mixed greens, olive oil, 2 teaspoons of honey, lemon juice, and a teaspoon of red pepper flakes. Season with salt and pepper. Top with the pecorino romano cheese, and cover the bowl. Set aside until ready.

In the bowl of a food processor, add the parsley, cilantro, shallot, vinegar, garlic, remaining teaspoon of honey, remaining teaspoon of red pepper flakes, and 1 teaspoon salt. Process until the mixture is finely chopped and incorporated. Keep the processor on as you drizzle in the vegetable oil until the mixture is well blended. Transfer the chimichurri to a bowl.

Heat the remaining two tablespoons of vegetable oil in the skillet until nearly smoking. Pat the steak dry with paper towels. Season both sides with pepper. Add the steak to the hot skillet and turn the heat down to medium-high. Brown the first side, it will take 1 1/2 – 2 minutes. Flip the steak and brown that side. Continue to flip cook and flip the steak in this manner until the internal temperature of the steak is 120 degrees.

Transfer the steak to a cutting board, spread 1/3 cup of the chimichurri on top, cover with aluminum foil, and let the steak rest for about 10 minutes. Thinly slice the steak against the grain before serving with the broccoli salad and the remaining chimichurri.

Avocado Ramen

This was definitely one of those “How weird, I have to make this!” recipes that have been nagging at it since I found it about a year ago. It was an excuse to add a couple things to my Asian ingredient repertoire that I didn’t have handy—miso and kombu. I don’t know what took me so long, but here we are.

This whole thing comes together really quick, which is not normally the case with ramen when you’re making the broth from scratch. The taste and texture from the miso and avocado were extremely rich and creamy. I could see it absolutely turning off some people, but I was in heaven. I couldn’t eat all of it, so I saved some for the next day. It solidifies into a gelatinous mass. It’s quite the thing to behold. I’d definitely keep this to a ‘day of’ thing, unless you have more broth to cut it with the next day to thin it back out while you’re cooking. I didn’t want to risk diluting the flavor by just adding water.

Inspiration: Tasty Plan

Ingredients

  • 1 strip kombu
  • 4 1/2 cups water
  • 1 whole avocado
  • 1/4 cup coconut milk
  • 1/4 cup miso paste [I used white]
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce or tamari
  • 10oz buckwheat noodles
  • 6 large Brussels sprouts, shredded
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • Soft boiled egg, cilantro, green onion, sesame seeds, etc. for serving

Preparation

Heat a skillet over medium-high heat. Add the olive oil, Brussels sprouts, and a pinch of salt. Stir often and sauté for about five minutes or so until they’re cooked through. Remove from heat and set aside.

Place the kombu and water in a large pot. Bring it to a boil before reducing it to a simmer and cooking for four minutes. Remove the kombu. Place the avocado, coconut milk, and miso paste in a blender. Add the broth in batches to the blender and blend until smooth. Once all of the broth is incorporated, return the mixture to the pot and keep warm over low heat.

In a large pot, cook the buckwheat noodles according to the package. Drain and rinse under cold water.

To serve, pour about a cup of the broth in a bowl, add a handful of noodles, some cooked Brussels sprouts, and whatever garnishes you’ve prepared.

Roasted Sausage, Beans, and Greens

After talking about how much I’ve been lusting after Cheese Club at Cyril’s, I went! They had to reschedule December’s pick-up party because of the weather, so I could make it happen. It was better than I could have imagined. I picked up a block of Rocket’s Robiola from Boxcarr handmade cheese, tasted four others [two of which were also Boxcarr’s], and had a pairing with Clay Pigeon’s 2013 pinot noir and a beer from Occidental that I can’t remember now. A couple of the bottles of pinot came home too. They were having a 25% off sale. Can you blame us?

Simplicity has been the name of the game since the weather has been crap, we’ve been busy, or there have been holiday leftovers in the fridge. Recipes like this are what I want. Protein. Greens. Fiber. Put in a pan. Roast. Eat. Cheese not optional. This works with pretty much any combination.

Inspiration: Food52

Ingredients

  • 1 bunch Swiss chard
  • 1 16oz can cannellini beans, drained and rinsed
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • 1 teaspoon smoked paprika
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1lb sausage [about four], cut in half lengthwise and then sliced
  • Salt and pepper
  • Shredded parmesan, optional

Preparation

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.

Tear the Swiss chard leaves into bite size pieces. You can not use the stems if you want, but I chopped them up and used them.

In a large baking dish or ovenproof skillet, combine the chard and beans. Season with salt and pepper.

In a small bowl, whisk together the lemon juice, mustard, paprika, and olive juice. Drizzle over chard and beans. Mix thoroughly with your hands. Nestle the sausage pieces into the greens.

Nestle the sausage pieces into the greens. Roast for 20-25 minutes. The chard should be tender and the edges crispy. If your sausage isn’t precooked, it should no longer be pink.

Top with shredded parmesan before serving.

Cacio e Pepe Pasta with Roasted Vegetables

I’m really, really falling for Cyril’s @ Clay Pigeon Winery lately. They have three of my favorite things — wine, cheese, and charcuterie. They have a lovely space. They have a cheese club that I haven’t brought myself to participate in but follow it with rapt attention. They hosted an urban winery event recently with more of my three favorite things. Fourteen wineries were in attendance. Nonperishables for charity were contributed. It was a great time. Wineries now on my radar that weren’t before — Fausse Piste and Jasper Sisco.

Cacio e Pepe. Cheese and pepper. Two of my favorite things. What don’t they make better? I like to eat vegetables, but I definitely don’t eat as many as I should. I could blame it on a variety of reasons, but I’ll just own it. I did eat a jar of canned beets standing over the sink the other day. That’s the kind of classy vegetable lover I am.

The article from Bon Appetit that spawned this whole thing said a lot of what I feel. It spoke to me. Sometimes I want a certain level of vegetable matter in my dish because a salad just feels silly. Roasting a ton of vegetables, covering them in a buttery cheese sauce and a ton of pepper really makes all of this worthwhile. The pasta is just a filler. I could have easily doubled the vegetables and eaten them as is. I went with sweet potato to finally kill that craving from months ago and some Brussels because it’s the season. The world is your oyster. Just make sure they’re evenly sized pieces so you can let them roast together.

Inspiration: Bon Appetit

Ingredients

  • 1 large sweet potato, cubed
  • 5-7 Brussels sprouts — halved or quartered to get them the same size as the sweet potato
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • salt and pepper
  • 1/2lb pasta of choice
  • 2 tablespoons of butter
  • Pecorino cheese

Preparation

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees and line a pan with parchment or a Silpat. In a large bowl, toss the sweet potato cubes and brussels sprouts with the olive oil and salt and pepper. Spread the vegetables on the pan in an even layer. Roast them for about 45 minutes or until soft and browning on the edges.

Cook your pasta according to package directions. Before draining, reserve a cup of pasta water.

In a large skillet, melt the butter and add a ton of black pepper. Add a ladleful of the pasta water and bring the mixture to a boil. Toss the cooked pasta in the mixture. Make sure it’s well coated before adding the vegetables. Grate a ton of Pecorino cheese over everything. It should melt into the hot ingredients and turn glossy. Taste for more salt, pepper, and cheese.

Beans and Greens with Sardines

It’s really hard to get a decent photo of an egg salad sandwich, so there isn’t one for you. If you have any interest in the salad of eggs like I am, you should make this one. It was so good. I promise you can’t really taste the anchovies other than a hint of saltiness. I toasted sourdough and topped it with some mixed greens.

The thought of sardines may make some your nose crinkle, too. In that case, you have my blessing to add whatever else sounds good here. Anything would be good here. Nothing would be good here. I’d gladly eat collards and white beans most days [which is pretty much all I bought at the store tonight]. It’s a comforting kind of wonderful. Sardines added a nice little saltiness and protein that you wouldn’t have otherwise. You probably see all of those red flecks of crushed red pepper. You’re not surprised anymore, are you? Add more or less. I added even more after I took the photo.

I’ve been toying with making beans from scratch, but I’m afraid. Afraid I’ll never want to eat them out of the can anymore, and I never plan ahead to soak beans overnight.

beans-greens-sardines

Inspiration: Epicurious

Ingredients

  • 4 tablespoons olive oil
  • 3 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
  • 1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper
  • 1 large bunch of collard greens, thick stems removed, and chopped into bite sized pieces
  • 1 cup chicken broth
  • 15oz can cannellini beans, drained and rinsed
  • 1 teaspoon red wine vinegar
  • 1 4.2oz tin of sardines in olive oil [I used Matiz Gallego]

Preparation

Heat four tablespoons of olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add garlic and crushed pepper. Stir often until the garlic starts to turn colors. Add greens by the handful so it’ll all fit into the pan. Toss to cover in the oil. Add the broth, cover, and simmer until the greens are tender. This should take about 5-7 minutes. Add the beans and simmer uncovered until the beans are warmed and the liquid is mostly gone. Stir in the vinegar. Add salt and pepper.

Chop the sardines into small pieces and sprinkle over the top of the greens.