Category: Andrew

Shrimp Cobb Salad

Look at how pretty this salad is. I’m patting myself on the back here. Cobb salads are great for when you want vegetables but want more than some whisps of lettuce. Some notable Cobbs [aka, the ones I order most often] — the brisket Cobb at Podnah’s Pit or the giant Cobb from Tilt that weighs what feels like 10lbs. Ahhh, now I wish I didn’t go to Tilt’s website to get that link. I want that burger on the homepage.

I’m not normally a corn person. I’ll eat it, but not go out of my way for it. Recipes, however, are a different story. I’m one of those follow the rules people. I can’t help it. As usual, my avocado wasn’t that ripe. Edible, but not my favorite. Next time I’d just buy guacamole, but that doesn’t photograph nearly as well. That green chunky stuff you see is a deliciously simple cilantro-lime vinaigrette. Finally using an entire bunch of cilantro in one sitting was quite the experience. That never happens. The salad was just as awesome as you would expect a giant Cobb to be. Roasted shrimp is such a change from the norm. After taking the time to put it together, Andrew and I just attacked the platter with a fork. It’s a lot of salad for two people, but we pretty much conquered it.

Shrimp Cobb2

Inspiration: Damn Delicious


  • 1lb medium shrimp, peeled and deveined
  • 4 tablespoons olive oil, divided
  • 1 tablespoon Creole seasoning [I might have used the carne asada seasoning blend because that’s what I had on hand]
  • 4 slices of bacon, diced
  • 2 large hardboiled eggs, diced
  • 5 cups chopped romaine lettuce
  • 1 avocado, chopped
  • 1 cup corn kernels
  • 1/2 cup blue cheese crumbles
  • 1 cup cilantro, mostly leaves instead of stems
  • 2 tablespoons lime juice
  • 1 jalapeno, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
  • Salt and pepper


Preheat the oven to 400° and line a baking sheet with parchment or tin foil. In a bowl toss the shrimp with two tablespoons of olive oil and the Creole seasoning. Spread the shrimp out on the baking sheet. Bake in the oven for about 4-5 minutes. The shrimp should be pink and cooked through.

In the bowl of a food processor, add the cilantro, lime juice, jalapeno, garlic, apple cider vinegar and remaining two tablespoons of olive oil. Pulse together until relatively smooth and creamy. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Set aside.

In a large skillet, cook the chopped bacon on medium high heat. Stir often until the bacon pieces are crispy. Drain on a plate lined with a paper towel.

Assemble the salad on a large plate or platter. Start with the base of romaine lettuce. In rows, line the shrimp, bacon, eggs, avocado, corn, and blue cheese crumbles. Spread the cilantro-lime dressing over the top.

Chicken Not-Quite-Instant Ramen

I’ve been on a nostalgia tour lately. Andrew was talking about Franz hand pies and I blurted out POP TARTS. Next thing I knew, there was a box of brown sugar and cinnamon Pop Tarts in the house. They are just as good as I remembered. I’m pretty sure there is a solid part of my childhood and teen years where I was personally responsible for the demise of hundreds of Pop Tarts. They were my lifeblood [that and Taco Bell, but that’s another story…]. I can’t believe they were as good I remembered.

Top Ramen falls into that category too. I remember eating many a packet, including the sodium laden seasoning packets. They were kind of addicting. Probably by design. It wasn’t until I was much older I started eating legit ramen thanks to their status as being one of the trendy foods. The ramen shops seem to be popping up at an incredible pace. They are the new cupcake.

The broth is key. I actually prefer more minimal ingredients and just letting the base speak for itself, but no one [read: me] has time to slow cook some great broth. This quick and dirty method worked for me. Soft boiled eggs are key. I didn’t get the timing quite right and it’s a little overcooked, but it was worthwhile. To keep the cook time to a minimum, I bought a store-roasted chicken. Poaching chicken in the broth probably would assist in the flavor department, but we all know I’m lazy.

It was a solid bunch of ramen. Way better than the seasoning packet, and not that much longer on the cook time. I’m planning on making this way more often if only to practice soft boiled eggs.

Chicken Ramen

Inspiration: Fork Knife Swoon & Yes to Yolks


  • 2 packets of instant ramen
  • 1 breast and 1 thigh from one roasted chicken, chopped
  • 1 handful of shitake mushrooms, thinly sliced
  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter
  • 3 garlic cloves, sliced
  • 2 teaspoons fresh grated ginger
  • 1 tablespoon miso paste [I used white]
  • 3 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 1/2 teaspoon red chile flakes
  • 1/2 tablespoon rice wine vinegar
  • 2 teaspoons toasted sesame oil
  • 4 cups chicken stock
  • 1 small bunch of green onions, sliced
  • 2-3 serranos, sliced for garnish
  • 2 soft boiled eggs for garnish


In a large pot, melt the butter at medium-high heat. Add the garlic cloves and ginger. Stir often for about 30 seconds until fragrant. Add the miso paste, soy sauce, red chile flakes, and rice wine vinegar. Stir until incorporated, another 30 seconds more. Pour in the 4 cups of stock and the sesame oil. Bring to a boil. Add the chopped chicken and mushrooms. Reduce the heat and simmer for about 10 minutes.

In a separate pot, cook the ramen according to package directions. Don’t use the seasoning packet. To serve, split the ramen noodles into two large bowls. Divide the broth between the two bowls. Garnish with green onions, serranos, and a soft boiled egg cut in half.

Chicken Fajita Salad

I picked up the weirdest, most inedible avocado for this recipe. It should be no surprise that finding a ripe avocado on demand is damn near impossible around here. Your best bet is to plan ahead, since they’re usually rock hard, and age them on your counter. If you happen to find one that isn’t rock hard, odds are that it has dents from every person who came before you to squeeze it in hopes that it was the one avocado in the pile that wasn’t hard as a rock. Don’t be lured into a false sense of security. If it feels ripe, it’s not. It’s an unripe avocado bruised to high hell. Poor thing.

I thought I found something between rock and mush. It actually gave a little to the touch. I could still deal with a mostly unripe one. Desperate times call for desperate measures. When I got home and tried to cut it open, the two halves wouldn’t come apart. At all. I felt like I was hacking into a mango. After working it for a few minutes—twisting and pulling, pulling and twisting—the pit finally split in half letting me not only a half of an avocado in each hand but the pit too. As if I weren’t already thoroughly freaked out, the texture of the avocado flesh felt like plastic. It felt like a Barbie with avocado green flesh. Bizarre. A fork’s tines would barely puncture it without some serious effort. I was thoroughly creeped out. I should have just bought the guacamole that New Seasons makes. I should have known better [fyi, that wasn’t New Seasons that sold me the weird avocado, I’m pretty sure they’re better than that].

At least this salad was good without it.

Chicken Fajita Salad

Inspiration: Buzzfeed Tasty


  • 2 chicken breasts, sliced
  • 1 red bell pepper, thinly sliced
  • 1 yellow bell pepper, thinly sliced
  • 1 yellow onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon cumin
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 5 tablespoons olive oil
  • 3 tablespoons lime juice
  • 1 teaspoon brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon chile flakes [or two if you’re me]
  • 1 head of romaine, chopped
  • 1 avocado, optional for serving


Heat two tablespoons of olive oil on medium-high heat in a large skillet. Add the chicken, red and yellow peppers, onion, salt, cumin, and garlic powder. Stir well to coat in oil and mix in all the spices. Cook, stirring often, for about 7-10 minutes. Once the chicken is cooked through, the peppers and onions will be soft. Remove from heat.

In a small bowl or a mason jar with a lid, add the remaining 3 tablespoons of olive oil, lime juice, sugar, and chile flakes. Whisk together if in a bowl or seal the lid on the jar and shake. Add the romaine to your serving plate or bowl before topping with the fajita mixture. Drizzle with dressing and top with avocado if you actually live in a world with good avocados.

You can mix it all together in a bowl first and serve from there, but I find that all the heavy stuff just goes to the bottom, and if you aren’t eating it in one sitting, the lettuce will inevitably get soggy. The method above avoids all that.


Bánh Mì Hot Dog

The grill was in full effect this weekend. Back-to-back 100 degree days will force you outside. We’re some of the lucky souls with air conditioning, but when it’s that hot, it struggles. Nothing says ‘holy crap, it’s hot out’ quite like grilling several pounds of marinated pork, sipping copious amounts of Pacifico with lime, and eating your weight in tacos, chips, and salsa.

I seek out hot dogs very infrequently, but when I want one, I want one. Corn dogs are a totally different animal. It’s hard to say no to those. They’re a weakness. I fall into two very different camps regarding hot dogs. It either has to be unbelievably simple—Bun. Dog. Mustard.—or they have to be interesting. Like this dog.

I’m a sucker for a bánh mì. A bánh mì is a Vietnamese sandwich. They usually are simple with a meat or tofu, crunchy veggies or pickled veggies, and a crunchy little baguette. There is a food cart downtown by the office that has them for $3. Well, they did. They closed up for awhile and came back as something else but the menu looked similar the last time I walked by. The freshness of the ingredient, the crispness of the veggies, and the spiciness of the sauce are the best parts. It translates well to a hot dog.

Bahn Mi Hot Dog

Inspiration: Real Simple


  • 4 hot dogs
  • 4 buns
  • 1/4 cup mayonnaise
  • 2-3 tablespoons sriracha
  • 1/4 cucumber, sliced
  • 1 carrot, peeled and shredded
  • 1/4 cup mint, chopped


In a small bowl, whisk together the sriracha and mayonnaise.

Heat grill on medium high heat. Place dogs across the grate. Roll the dogs after a minute or two when the grill marks show up.

Optional: grill the buns

Spread the spicy mayonnaise mixture on the buns. Layer the hot dogs, sliced cucumber, and shredded carrots. Drizzle on more sauce as you see fit. Top with chopped mint.

Broccoli Raab and Goat Cheese Pasta with Shrimp

[this is currently being written while Roma is waging war against a fly under my desk]

Burger Week is almost over, and I hardly participated this year. I have eaten one burger. Well, one half of a burger. We stopped at one location and the wait was well over an hour [which is expected], so we left and ate falafel at Wolf & Bear’s insteadAn excellent choice. Afterward, we went to Alberta Street Pub. They were also still slow [and still expected], but I didn’t have a case of hangry looming. Beers were consumed. The Olympics were watched because that’s all that restaurants and bars show right now. We split a peach caprese juicy lucy. What is a juicy lucy you say? That is a burger stuffed with cheese instead of cheese on top—so the mozzarella of caprese is inside the burger. The tomatoes were traded into peaches caramelized in bacon vinaigrette. I’ll let you think about that for a minute.

I’ve been craving macaroni and cheese lately. I don’t want to succumb to it for some reason, but it’s there calling my name. I had a craving for a ham, gruyere, and butter baguette sandwich from Addy’s Sandwich Bar for awhile, and I squashed that craving earlier this week. Coco Donuts has been posting all kinds of donuts on Instagram. It gave me a craving one of their signature donuts—a raised donut with chocolate frosting and topped with chocolate covered espresso beans. That craving was satisfied this morning. Now this mac and cheese craving comes out of no where, and I’m trying to figure out what to do with it. I’m not craving a specific place’s mac, so we’ll see how long this sticks around. The odds of me making a batch are slim.

This pasta is the closest thing I’ve made to macaroni and cheese in a long, long time. Since this blue cheese pasta probably. It doesn’t look like I’ve ever made anything remotely traditional when it comes to macaroni and cheese. This mac and not-cheese? Talk about flashbacks. The whole shells and cheese + greens thing is a winner. I could always stand to see some greens in any mac and cheese I’m eating if only to make it look better. Certain bitter greens are great for cutting through richness, but in this case it was subtle. Thanks, broccoli raab [or rapini]. Goat cheese is tangy and lovely. It melts into the warm pasta creating a light creamy sauce, so I added a few fat chunks of it because I like it like that. Since there wasn’t any significant sources of I added shrimp because I had a frozen bag of it staring at me every time I look in the freezer. The shrimp are optional. You could leave it off entirely or add something else of your choosing. I don’t really think you could go wrong.

Shrimp, Broccoli Raab, Goat Cheese Pasta

Inspiration: Saveur


  • 12oz small pasta, like shells or orecchiette
  • 1 bunch rapini or broccoli raab, rinsed and roughly chopped
  • 1/3 cup olive oil
  • 6 cloves of garlic, smashed
  • 1 teaspoon chile flakes
  • 4oz goat cheese, softened
  • 1lb frozen, peeled and deveined shrimp
  • 1 tablespoon paprika
  • salt and pepper


Bring a large pot of water to boil. Boiling water takes forever. Once it starts boiling, add the rapini. Cook for about 4 minutes before removing to a large bowl of ice water. Pat dry the rapini. Don’t drain the water from the pot. Use it to cook the pasta according to package instructions.

In a large skillet, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the garlic, and stir often until it’s golden brown. Add the shrimp, the paprika, and a healthy pinch of salt and pepper. Sauté until the shrimp is pink and cooked through. Add the rapini and chile flakes. Toss until combined and then remove from heat.

Mix the drained pasta and the shrimp and rapini mixture together in a large bowl [or pasta pot]. Add half of the goat cheese to the pasta and stir to incorporate. It will melt and distribute. Add the remaining goat cheese as dollops to the individual servings.